Summertime Fun

Summertime Fun

I’m sure you’ve seen the memes on social media that reference not wanting to “adult” on any given day. Typically, I don’t mind “adulting,” but recently, with Mother Nature’s dose of hot weather and memories of how much I loved summer break as a kid, I’ve realize how I, and probably most youngsters my age, didn’t appreciate things as they were.

Most days would start at the pool. We always went early – just about the time it was opening. Sometimes I had the whole pool to myself for a short while. A few hours and a piece of pizza and some ice cream later, we would head home in time for my mom’s “stories” - better known as afternoon soaps. Yes, that was during the whole Luke and Laura saga.

More often than not, an afternoon trip to the local library was typically on my agenda following General Hospital. It was just around the corner from my house and they had big, comfy bean bag chairs – perfect for reading books for the summer reading program. Judy Blume always provided perspectives for the adolescent mind to ponder.

Following a supper that was usually prepared on a grill, evenings were commonly spent riding bikes with the other neighborhood kids, playing kickball in the street and after dark, catching lightning bugs. I truly didn’t have a care in the world, but yet was so anxious to grow up. My friends at the time shared those same sentiments – we just wanted to make our own rules and not have to be home when the street lights came on.

Years later, with bills to pay and job responsibilities to be concerned about, the days of the care-free summers are long gone. “Adulting” is very much a part of daily life, but it is fun to think back, though. It makes me realize how very blessed I am to have such good childhood memories. 


I�m sure you�ve seen the memes on social media that reference not wanting to �adult� on any given day. Typically, I don�t mind �adulting,� but recently, with Mother Nature�s dose of hot weather and memories of how much I loved summer break as a kid, I�ve realize how I, and probably most youngsters my age, didn�t appreciate things as they were.