Swimming – More Than Just a Sport

Swimming – More Than Just a Sport

Last fall, my 15 year old son (who is on the Autism spectrum) informed me that he signed up for the swim team at school.  At the time I had very little knowledge of what occurred at a swim meet as I have never been to one.  To be honest, I was quite surprised that my introverted son, who has never played a school sport in his life, was even interested. 

We attended the coach’s informational meeting and talked to veteran swim parents for guidance.   He was enrolled in a few swimming and diving classes to polish him up a bit.  I read extensively on safe snacking diets that helped keep energy up without making him feel too full to swim.  A trip to Dick’s Sporting Goods (well honestly, a few trips) was in order.  Finally, he was set and ready to swim.

As we move through the season, I see my son progressing in a lot of ways.  He is swimming at a faster pace, eating healthier and even wanting to hit the gym to strengthen his body.  However, the most appealing progress I have seen is in his attitude.  He is an athlete now and part of a team.  His teammates are a second family to him.  They reach out and high-five each other (and opposing teams as well) before they even get out of the water.  Basically, he has reached a whole new level of confidence due to the positive interaction with his peers and the amazingly caring attitude of a great coach.

My husband and I have even volunteered as timers and we have seen first-hand the wonderful sportsmanship qualities these swimmers have.  They are competing against different schools, their teammates and themselves; keeping up a good moral by encouraging each other.

I love that my son loves swimming so much, and is surrounded by people who have made such a great difference to his life.


Last fall, my 15 year old son (who is on the Autism spectrum) informed me that he signed up for the swim team at school.  At the time I had very little knowledge of what occurred at a swim meet as I have never been to one.