Smoke Detectors & Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Smoke Detectors & Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Did you know that your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are only good for seven to 10 years? Yes, you need to make sure you replace the batteries yearly, but you also need to replace all detectors that are 10 years old. To determine the age of your smoke alarm, you can look at the back and you will find the manufacture date. Even if you have hardwired detectors, they also need to be replaced 10 years from the manufacture date.

 

In most fires, there are either no detectors or the detectors DO NOT WORK properly. It could be because they are too old or the batteries have not been replaced yearly or they may not have been tested periodically throughout the year to make sure they are in good working order.

It’s important to have enough smoke alarms in your home. Fire research has demonstrated that with today’s modern furnishings, fires can spread much more rapidly than in the past when more natural materials were used. Because of this, having a sufficient number of properly located smoke alarms is essential to maximize the amount of available escape time.  ONE ON EACH FLOOR WOULD BE IDEAL, BUT NOW THEY ARE SUGGESTING ONE IN EVERY BEDROOM.

Now please read this paragraph if you have not fully read the other paragraphs in this blog.  CARBON MONOXIDE has no smell or taste; it is a byproduct of combustion. Humans and other animals with lungs cannot tell when they are breathing in carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide competes with oxygen for binding sites on hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is the molecule in red blood cells that carries oxygen from our lungs to tissues all over our body, and returns carbon dioxide from the tissues. Carbon monoxide binds to hemoglobin with a binding affinity over 200 times greater than that of oxygen. In other words, carbon monoxide is much better at getting into hemoglobin than oxygen. If oxygen cannot get into hemoglobin because that space is occupied with carbon monoxide, then parts of our body (tissues) will be starved of oxygen and die. Our bodies have no use for carbon monoxide. If we breathe it in it deprives our blood of oxygen. 

 

A CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR in your home is ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL if you have any gas appliances or an attached garage. Beware of gas powered tools and equipment when used inside rooms such as a basement or garage. Do not leave gasoline-powered motors running in your garage (i.e. motorcycles, cars or lawn mowers). If you have an indoor barbeque, do not use charcoal. When using chemicals that contain methylene chloride (a noxious colorless liquid used as a solvent, e.g. in paint strippers) make sure you use a mask.  Be sure to keep household appliances in good working order and use them safely. Make sure the servicing is carried out by fully qualified and registered professionals. Do not use gas ranges or ovens for heating. Do not block air vents in rooms. Make sure all rooms are well ventilated. Be especially careful if your home is very well insulated. Chimneys and flues should be swept thoroughly and regularly by a fully qualified chimney sweep. This should be done at least once a year, so mark your calendar, or schedule a reminder on your computer and smartphone. The carbon monoxide detector will protect you against any of your gas powered items if they do leak.

Most carbon monoxide detectors give out a loud high-pitched sound when carbon monoxide gas levels have risen beyond a certain point. If this should happen, immediately get out of your home or office.  If the gas levels are high, JUST AN ELECTRIC SPARK could set off an explosion in your home.  For example, turning on a light switch in your home could cause an explosion. If you are in your home and smell gas, GET OUT OF YOUR HOME, call 911.  Should you smell natural gas outside your home, DO NOT ENTER YOUR HOME, call 911.

Now, please purchase new smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors to make sure you and your family are prepared for a fire or a carbon monoxide leak.  Hopefully, you will not need these detectors, but you will be equipped in case you do.  They can save you and your family’s lives.  

 


Did you know that your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are only good for seven to 10 years? Yes, you need to make sure you replace the batteries yearly, but you also need to replace all detectors that are 10 years old. To determine the age of your smoke alarm, you can look at the back and you will find the manufacture date. Even if you have hardwired detectors, they also need to be replaced 10 years from the manufacture date.