Keep the Faith

Keep the Faith

Keep the Faith

Some recent events caused me to remember something I saw over the summer. I’m no tennis fan, but I happened to catch a few moments of the Wimbledon tennis tournament.  The TV coverage showed the door the players use to get to Centre Court, one of the most famous venues in all of sport.  Above the doorway is a quote that reads:

“If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster

And treat those two impostors just the same.”

I’d never heard that quote and wondered where it was from.  My law partner, Chris Regan, would have known that the quote comes from a poem called “If” by Rudyard Kipling. I had to Google it.  The entire poem is worth reading.  It’s about winning with grace and losing with class. It’s about living fearlessly while keeping things in perspective. It’s about growing up and realizing that the highest highs and lowest lows will come to us all, but the ability to persevere (“Hold on!”) is the only thing that counts. There is a similar quote from President Theodore Roosevelt.  He said: “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” Kipling and Roosevelt offer good advice.  Sometimes it takes a special person to remind us of things we should never forget.  Keep the faith.