West Virginia Personal Injury Lawyer Blog

Sporting Clays

Sporting Clays

Growing up in the country I was always around family and friends who loved hunting. When my daughter married a man, Nick, who also loved hunting, it wasn’t anything new or unusual to me. When he passed along his love of hunting and sportsmanship to my grandson, Owen, I wasn’t surprised. Owen has proven to be a very good marksman for a 10-year-old, and when his dad discovered that there was a youth sporting clays club about an hour from their home, it didn’t take long for Owen to become a member of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes. For those of you not familiar with sporting clays, it is a target game designed to simulate field shooting. The shooters set out on a course and are presented with a wide variety of targets that duplicate the flight path of game birds. Courses are laid out in natural surroundings and will usually include five or 10 shooting stations. The shooters move from one station to the other as they complete the course. Owen’s season begins in the spring and ends in early fall, with practices and shoots every weekend. The state championship for Pennsylvania is held in June, and we were so proud that in 2013, during his rookie season, Owen’s rookie team of three placed second in the state. At that point, we were all hooked and this grammy became a sporting clays groupie.

Vacation Wars

Vacation Wars

It’s that time of year again when a lot of families are hashing out their summer vacation plans. There are many choices: beach, cruise, amusement and water parks, all-inclusive, maybe even a trip to a foreign country– for most families there is something for everyone. But what to do when the family cannot come to an agreement? Or should I say when my husband and I can’t come to an agreement?

High School Students Take Over the Valley

High School Students Take Over the Valley

Many of you may recall the news last year about the assassins’ game that many teams of high school teens join from our local high schools. This is a game where you are a target for a set amount of time. If you get “assassinated” in that timeframe, you’re eliminated. If not, you remain in the game. If you get the target you are assigned, you remain in the game. If not, you’re out.

EXPLORING WEST VIRGINIA FLYING BY THE SEAT OF YOUR PANTS

EXPLORING WEST VIRGINIA FLYING BY THE SEAT OF YOUR PANTS

Do you know that feeling you get in the pit of your stomach when you are traveling and your car goes over a dip in the road? It doesn’t happen too often anymore because of interstate travel, but if you drive over the secondary roads down through the mountains of West Virginia you can still experience it quite often. On the few times that it does happen to me, it brings back memories of being squished in the backseat of some 1950’s vehicle with my other siblings on summer vacation. I can still recall my dad’s amused eyes in the rearview mirror as he gazed back at us as we held our tummies squealing “Ooohhhhhhhhhhhhhh.” He would chuckle and say, “Did you lose your stomach back there?”

WHAT IS MEDICAL MALPRACTICE?

WHAT IS MEDICAL MALPRACTICE?

Most of us have certain expectations about how we would like to be treated at a doctor’s office or a hospital. We would all like to be treated with respect, care and compassion and we certainly don’t want to be kept in the waiting room for hours. One expectation that we should also have is the expectation that we will be given the best care possible under the circumstances. What happens if we do not get that level of care and somebody gets hurt? This is the question that faces many individuals and families across the country, as statistics show. We often get calls from families in these very circumstances and it is not unusual for these families to tell us at the beginning of the conversation that they are not sure what to do or how to proceed. This is the start of a conversation that eventually turns to whether or not the doctor or the hospital in questions has committed what’s known as “medical malpractice.”

Raising a Reader

I remember hearing the slogan when I was growing up: “Reading is FUNdamental.”

I couldn’t agree more. Reading is a fundamental building block for a successful life and career. But it’s also fun. It should be a joy to read, not a drudgery! That’s why my wife and I read to our daughters from a young age and encouraged both of them to read for themselves. Now that we have granddaughters, we have an opportunity to start the process all over again.

Reminding Ourselves What Is Important

Reminding Ourselves What Is Important

Do we really need to be reminded to stay connected with the people we love? I guess so since we have been inundated with commercials from Values.com telling us to take time to talk to our husbands and wives and call our children when we are away on a business trip. While the commercials are sweet, what has become of our society when we have to be reminded to do these things; or worse yet, being guilted into believing we are bad people because we may need an occasional reminder to remember what is important in our lives?

Life and Lessons

Life and Lessons

I like to think that I have learned a lot about life in the 58 years I have spent on this Earth. Like most of us, my parents taught me most of what I needed to know as I grew up: the importance of kindness; the personal satisfaction that comes from hard work; and the sore rear end you get when you throw tomatoes at the neighbor’s garage door. There are some lessons, however, that are best taught by life. My life -- or more accurately, my life over the last twenty years -- is a perfect example of one of life’s most important lessons: the need to accept responsibility for one’s actions.

POST STROKE LIFE

POST STROKE LIFE

Although my husband’s stroke was a catastrophic event in both our lives, we have learned to cope with the help of friends and each other and his wonderful caregiver, Terri. He has improved to the point that I can leave him totally alone for an hour or so to go to the store or to the Mall.

Evidence of Informed Consent is Irrelevant in Medical Negligence Case

Evidence of Informed Consent is Irrelevant in Medical Negligence Case

On March 25, 2015, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, in Brady v. Urbas, held that evidence regarding informed consent is irrelevant in cases involving claims solely based upon medical negligence.

Ms. Brady sought consultation with Dr. Urbas, a podiatrist, for problems with her right foot. Dr. Urbas informed Ms. Brady of the nature of her condition, i.e. “hammer toe,” and they discussed available treatment options, including surgery. Dr. Urbas also informed Ms. Brady of the risks and reasonably anticipated outcomes associated with each alternative treatment, and specifically advised Ms. Brady that even under the most optimal surgical circumstances, bad outcomes could still occur. Ms. Brady memorialized her understanding of the information by signing a consent form.

recent verdicts & news

Winning Experience: Read about our Appellate Decisions, as well as our Verdicts and Settlements.

Recent cases: Kilgore v. Bedi, (Ohio County, West Virginia, 2013) - Medical Malpractice, Personal Injuries - nearly $900,000 Verdict

-- Turkoly v. Gentile et al., Verdict, $5,100,000.00(Medical Malpractice, Mahoning County, Ohio, 2013) -- Cox v. Personal Service Insurance Company, (Belmont County, Ohio, 2012) - Bad Faith Insurance Practices - $10,000,000.00 Verdict;